Life’s a Beach, especially when you Tri

The first 5K I completed last June was part of a series of events in New Smyrna Beach put on by the “Run for  a Cause” race organizers.  Since that’s an easy trek, I don’t mind being on their mailing list…

So, about 3 weeks ago now, one of their “Come out to play” emails landed in my inbox, describing the Life’s a Beach Triathlon.  Now, I have been swimming pretty regularly since late last fall to keep from killing my feet and legs while training for half-marathons. So, I will confess to having already mused a bit about maybe someday considering the possibility of a triathlon.  But the closest thing to riding a bike I’ve done since 1998 (at the latest) is riding my motorcycle.  So, pssshhhh…

But this Life’s a Beach thing was awfully intriguing.  Just 200 meters swimming, 5 miles on a bike and 2 miles run/walk.  And on the beach. With goofy obstacles.  And prizes for costumes. And last place finishers got awards – in every division!

So.. I sent the email to my enabler, I mean sister, who said,  DO IT!

I don’t have a bike

You can borrow P’s. It’s in my garage.  Do it!

I haven’t ridden a bike in at least 2 decades.

You’ll remember how. And I’ve even got a helmet. If I weren’t headed out of town that weekend, I’d totally go with you.  You have to do it.

I’d never even watched a triathlon.  I’ve never done two of those three activities back to back, much less all three (for obvious reasons).  But I needed to do this.  Why?

Because it scared me.
Because I need to do things before I’ve overprepared for them.
Because I need to be vulnerable and open to the idea of spectacular  failure and embarrassment.

And so I did.  I signed up, knowing I had exactly 2 weeks to get ready.

I needed to get the bike, have it checked out, see if I could actually stay upright on it, then see if my legs would pump the thing for five miles.

In that same 2 weeks, I needed to see if I could go from swimming to biking and from biking to walking.  If those combos worked, I was pretty sure I could manage all three.

I got 2 or 3 rides in before the day, including a couple of combo workout attempts.  The swim-bike test turned out to include a little walking as a cool down (because jeepers the bike does funny things to your backside muscles…)

How did it go??? 

Who knew my sister was so clever? She was totally right. I could do it.
And it was totally a blast.
And I learned a few things…

  1. Swimming in the ocean is very different from splashing around in the waves to cool off after sweating on the beach.
  2. An out & back ride on the beach includes a u-turn at the midpoint.  Turning left or right on neighborhood streets doesn’t actually prep you for a u-turn.
  3. Having a towel and plan for the transition point from swim to bike would have been helpful. Having a clue at that point would have been helpful.
  4. It’s not that painful to ask other competitors for help, especially at a not-super-competetive event, especially when they aren’t in professional-looking triathlon gear.  I’m sure those folks were friendly, too, but they were a bit intimidating…
  5. I have internalized a whole lot of fat/body-shaming BS in my lifetime… more than I even knew.  I can now believe that I am healthier and stronger than the imperfections and jiggly bits I couldn’t look past before.  No matter what anyone else sees, I can see the bad-ass muscles I’ve been building.

Here are a few pics of me on the day…

The swim portion… pretty sure I’m among the group coming back in here

Heading out of the transition area, looking as if I know how to ride…

About 90% done with the run/walk section, we had gone through some tubes and under a net.. now beneath the “sea wall”

Leaping over the beach chairs…

Limbo to the finish line? Are you kidding me?? Yeah… nope. Too tired.

This is what excited to be DONE looks like.

In case you’re curious about official race-type results:

They chip timed, but only start-finish, not splits or transitions (because it’s a beach bum thing, not a sanctioned event thing).   And the swim portion was not a precise distance because one of the buoys floated off during the second wave start and we had to guesstimate where to go.  But still… I found myself in the middle of the pack and happy to be there!

 

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Of Flames and Fruit

You may recall that Luke started the book of Acts by setting up a sort of transition – the shift from Jesus’ bodily ministry on earth to the church’s embodiment of his ministry.

He lets us know that there were 40 days during which Jesus made appearances among his followers, teaching and commissioning them, even as he continued to do wonders in his resurrection form.

Luke also tells us about that strange day when Jesus ascended into heaven…  but not before he told the disciples to stay in Jerusalem and wait for the Spirit to come upon them.  It would be through the Holy Spirit that they would receive power.  They would then bear witness to God’s power, the power that raised Jesus from the dead, in Jerusalem, Judea, all Samaria and to the ends of the earth.

So they waited.

And waited.

They stayed put in Jerusalem, where folks eventually gathered for Pentecost. And here’s what happened… listen to Luke’s description in Acts 2

1 When the day of Pentecost had come, they were all together in one place. 2 And suddenly from heaven there came a sound like the rush of a violent wind, and it filled the entire house where they were sitting.3 Divided tongues, as of fire, appeared among them, and a tongue rested on each of them. 4 All of them were filled with the Holy Spirit and began to speak in other languages, as the Spirit gave them ability.

Maybe like me, you’ve wondered why, of all the ways that the Holy Spirit might become manifest, the Apostles were given the ability to speak in multiple unfamiliar languages.  

As the festival of Pentecost approached, Jerusalem again grew busy and crowded.  Like the Passover, Pentecost was a pilgrimage festivals.  One of those times of year that those Jews who had the means would come to Jerusalem, swelling the ranks of those who had lived in other nations. 

As Luke wrote…   there were devout Jews from every nation under heaven living in Jerusalem.   This meant  Jerusalem was quite the multilingual city.

And so, when the apostles started talking in different languages, you can be sure they drew a crowd.  A crowd of people heard these men- all of them Galileans – and understand exactly what they were preaching….

It must have been surreal, hearing one’s language spoken unexpectedly.  

I imagine it like the reaction of characters on Doctor Who- no matter where or when the TARDIS lands- no matter the language spoken by the beings they encounter, the ship’s translation circuit allows its passengers to hear in their own language (for us- English). The Doctor’s new companions are always a little puzzled at first, but eventually are able to focus on what is being said, rather than why they can understand it.

Any way… The Holy Spirit arrived in power and filled these men, so that they were fluently speaking in languages they had not previously known.

Luke says people were amazed and astonished.   They asked “Are not all these who are speaking Galileans?

8 And how is it that we hear, each of us, in our own native language? 9 Parthians, Medes, Elamites, and residents of Mesopotamia, Judea and Cappadocia, Pontus and Asia, 10 Phrygia and Pamphylia, Egypt and the parts of Libya belonging to Cyrene, and visitors from Rome, both Jews and proselytes, 11 Cretans and Arabs— in our own languages we hear them speaking about God’s deeds of power.”

It was a fair question.  What was God up to?

This Pentecost moment is more than just a sign of God’s ability to do unexpected things.  This is an important moment in the launching of a new movement. God is pursuing people in a new way to do a new thing.

Among the great variety of people gathered in Jerusalem, many of them would have been familiar with Hebrew or Greek, able to do a sort of instant translation as needed to understand what was said.  Kind of like I do when I’m among folks speaking Spanish.

I hear it, translate it in my head and then think about what it means.

But in that moment, God made all that work unnecessary. This Pentecost miracle means that the great variety of people hear the good news in their first language.
The language of their hearts, not their heads.
Their go-to language.  

They don’t have to search for the meaning…
They immediately understand what is said.
Which makes it that much easier to trust what they were hearing

This is important because, while there were some who sneered… who called them drunk… Many other women and men heard and believed what the apostles were preaching.

These new believers were baptized began to learn how to follow Jesus. And when they spoke with other Jews – each in their own language – they, too, were able to share the good news about God’s love made flesh in Jesus, adding even more disciples to their numbers…

People the disciples themselves might not have been able to speak with beyond that Pentecost day.

And, remember those who were not residents of Jerusalem?
Those who had made the Pentecost pilgrimage that year?
THEY had a story to tell when they went home. As well as a sermon to share in their corner of the world.  

I always think of this holy cacophony on Pentecost as the payoff for the story that started way back in Babel, when humanity had tried so hard to build a tower to heaven as if we were gods.  All of those languages that separated people for generations have now been redeemed as God’s plan to draw every tribe and nation back into relationship with God.

Paul’s letter to the Galatians helps us understand that language isn’t always the barrier to our reconciliation with God. Sometimes God’s welcomes gets lost when we translate it into tradition.

For many Jewish Christ-followers, the law had been a comfort, even as they knew they could never fully obey, and therefore never become fully righteous… fully right with God.  But because of their lineage, their heritage, they had confidence in their belonging to the family of God.

But as the good news spread beyond the Jews into Gentile communities, how would this imperfect law observation affect them?  They didn’t trace their family lines back to the tribes of Israel?  Was true inclusion possible for them?

In Chapter 4, Paul brings an important household and family metaphor into play with coming of the Spirit to the Gentiles. Listen to the way he works to help them see their lives before and after Christ – the Messiah – comes on the seen as everyone’s Redeemer.

Galatians 4:1 My point is this: heirs, as long as they are minors, are no better than slaves, though they are the owners of all the property; 2 but they remain under guardians and trustees until the date set by the father. 3 So with us; while we were minors, we were enslaved to the elemental spirits of the world. 

4 But when the fullness of time had come, God sent his Son, born of a woman, born under the law, 5 in order to redeem those who were under the law, so that we might receive adoption as children. 6 And because you are children, God has sent the Spirit of his Son into our hearts, crying, “Abba! Father!” 7 So you are no longer a slave but a child,  and if a child then also an heir, through God.

Here, Paul wants the Galatians to see that being law-observant was necessary for a time… an interim period… but was not the final chapter in the long story of God’s relationship with humanity.

As children (minors) in God’s household, humankind would be considered heirs but not yet of the age to claim that inheritance.  The law acted as a sort of steward or guardian, giving us an imperfect experience of salvation and keeping us within the bounds of our relationship.

If you think about access to the head of the household and all of their holdings,  an heir who has not yet “come of age” may as well be a hired hand or an enslaved person in the household.

That is the before.  For Jews and Gentiles alike.

But now, knowing and believing all we do of Jesus as the Christ, having received the Holy Spirit, God made us so much more.

No longer in need of a steward, God’s children become the full heirs of God’s Kingdom, recipients of all the good and perfect gifts that God had longed to give. from the beginning.

Including the freedom of life in the Holy Spirit.

Paul says that Christ has set us free, free to live in God’s love.
Free to be children who know they are loved.  

Of all the stuff I learned in Child and Adolescent Development classes, I was most fascinated and moved by the way a parent’s love plays out in the behavior of toddlers. Technically, we see this at every stage during which children work to establish themselves as separate individuals…  including teenagers.

But you can see much more easily among children who are just beginning to be mobile.  The bond of love between the parent and child determines how free the child feels to go explore… and just how far they will wander.

Children who are loved. Who know they are loved.  Who have come to trust that their parent will be faithfully present and available as needed while they roam… They become confident in their own ability to navigate the world.

So they toddle off, a little farther each time they venture out. They check in, looking back to see if their parent is watching, but they aren’t as fearful.

Not like the child of a parent whose love and care seems conditioned on the child “getting it right.” Or the child whose parent is unpredictable, whose rules and expectations are confusing and capricious.

Those children stick close, hesitant and fearful.
Needing direction or correction or affirmation for every move, every choice

Imagine a child going to the playground, carrying with them and consulting a long list of rules in the book before choosing where to climb or what to play. They occasionally calling in a specialist to interpret the rules, just to be safe.

Over time, children who are corrected and encouraged with love come to know the values behind the house rules and expectations. They know them so well that they can improvise. They feel freedom to interpret what is happening around them and are able to respond appropriately.

Paul wants the Galatians (and us) to know that the law- written, preserved and proclaimed as a way of life- is not the same as having the Spirit of God living in us, prompting, prodding, guiding us in the way we should live.

You and I have been invited into a relationship that simplifies that whole complicated set of rules into a single guiding principle – the Law of Love.  

God said “Love me. Love me with every bit of the best of you… heart, soul, mind and spirit.” In the physical, mental, social, spiritual aspects of our lives, we are commanded to love an d honor God.  

Likewise, we are commanded to love our neighbors as we love ourselves.
So that all of our relationships with all of our neighbors honor God 

Which means love must be obvious in the physical, emotional, spiritual and intellectual interactions between us and others  – Be they family, friends, church folk, people we know in the neighborhood or complete strangers.

And the only way to live this life of love, Paul says, is to live by the Spirit.

What does that look like?

If we aren’t going to have a rulebook, judges and referees, how can we possibly know we are living by the Spirit and not just our own desires and passing fads?

Well, it’s not an exhaustive list, but starting in Galatians 5:16, Paul gives us a good idea of what to look for…

Live by the Spirit, I say, and do not gratify the desires of the flesh. 17 For what the flesh desires is opposed to the Spirit, and what the Spirit desires is opposed to the flesh; for these are opposed to each other, to prevent you from doing what you want. 18 But if you are led by the Spirit, you are not subject to the law.

19 Now the works of the flesh are obvious: fornication, impurity, licentiousness, 20 idolatry, sorcery, enmities, strife, jealousy, anger, quarrels, dissensions, factions, 21 envy, drunkenness, carousing, and things like these. I am warning you, as I warned you before: those who do such things will not inherit the kingdom of God.

22 By contrast, the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, generosity, faithfulness, 23 gentleness, and self-control. There is no law against such things. 24 And those who belong to Christ Jesus have crucified the flesh with its passions and desires. 25 If we live by the Spirit, let us also be guided by the Spirit. 26 Let us not become conceited, competing against one another, envying one another.

Funny thing about fruit – Including spiritual fruit –  I tend to think of it as a finished product. Something I can go get at the store when it’s in season.  But actually, it isn’t an end, so much as a continuation. 

Fruit is produced by a plant so that some creature… a bird, an animal, a human animal perhaps… will eat it.  And while that is good, and might even keep an animal alive for another day, producing fruit isn’t just about providing nourishment for another part of the ecological web around the plant.

Each fruit contains seeds that will travel with and in the critter that eats it.
Until the seed is dropped into new soil somewhere.
And then the cycle of life can begin anew.

This was not lost on Paul, who saw fruit daily on trees and bushes, He intentionally describes fruit as evidence of a healthy, thriving person and community of faith.

Because those fruit offer nourishment to a world
that hungers for kindness,
that is starved for generosity and compassion.  

When people experience through God’s people the love and peace offered by a life in Christ, we have the opportunity to bear witness to its source and to invite them to come and experience life anew…
Life in the Spirit.

Paul’s examples  aren’t just about making good choices, what it takes to be considered straight up moral individuals.  

The works of the flesh – the things that cry out to us from the brokenness of the world – these are exactly the opposite of loving, kind and gracious ways of living in community.  They are precisely the actions that cripple families and tear worshiping communities into apart. In fact, knowing that Paul is writing to a particular group of people whom he knew by name, it is not a stretch to imagine he is calling out specific and known situations.

God has expectations, to be sure.  Every parent does.
We talk about renouncing sin as we baptize new member at the font and as we take on responsibilities of leadership within the faith community.
We confess our sins each week, aloud as a community and in silence as individuals
Clearly, we believe that what we say think and do matters. To us and to God.
Hopefully, we see how what we fail to say and do matters just as greatly.

But just as Jesus included his promise to be with us as he commissioned his followers to go and make disciples, Paul reminds us that he also promised that we would receive all the power we need in order to bear witness to the glory and grace of God.

Pentecost was the answer to that promise.

The Holy Spirit – God’s own power – is available to each and all of us. We can claim and proclaim the new life we embrace as co-heirs with Jesus, adopted children of God, crucified and resurrected with Christ
Set free for the freedom

As we remember the life, death and resurrection of Christ at the table, in a few moments, we will have the opportunity to embrace freedom and reject the values we held before knowing the truth of God’s great love for us.

Nourished by the bread of life and the cup of salvation, may we live for one another, as God lives – through the Holy Spirit – in us.

Amen

One

Now – before we jump into the reading this morning, I want to back up just for a moment or two…  A couple of weeks ago, we looked at the work of the Jerusalem council as Luke recorded it in Acts.  

If you remember, the reason for that meeting was to gain consensus around how to fold in the new believers among them who were Gentiles.

There were some among the Jewish Christ-followers who believed that in order to become part of the community, Gentiles needed to be law-observant, even to the point of circumcising new converts.

Others, including Paul and Peter, argued that God was clearly at work in the Gentile churches, as evidenced by the presence of the Holy Spirit. The same kinds of signs and wonders that the Jewish bodies of believers were seeing and experiencing were happening in Antioch and other gatherings where few or no Jewish members were present.

The conclusion of this difficult conversation was clear – as God expanded the welcome of all nations into the family, the apostles would not require any rituals that were specific to the Jewish tradition. Going and making disciples was to be about teaching the ways of Jesus, seeking the gifts of the Spirit and bearing fruit as they bore witness to the death and resurrection of Jesus as the Messiah for all people.

It is within this context that we need to read the letter from Paul to the Galatians.  He had started this mostly-Gentile church, spent time teaching among them, assuring that they understood the source of their salvation – their faith in the work of Jesus Christ.

Now, they have been visited by some teachers who have told them they must observe the law. Paul writes this letter to remind them who they are – members of God’s household.
And to remind them how they got there -by faith.  

We are entering mid-stream, so the greetings and salutations are done.  After recalling for the Galatians his own struggles to keep the law, as well as a conversation with Peter about how keeping the law was not a means of creating belonging for most Jews, Paul is getting pretty fired up.          

Just before our reading for today starts he describes how he came to understand the difference between faith in the law and faith in Christ. I want to read a portion of chapter 2 for you.. from Eugene Peterson’s The Message, so you can hear it in a more contemporary language…

We Jews know that we have no advantage of birth over “non-Jewish sinners.”

We know very well that we are not set right with God by rule-keeping but only through personal faith in Jesus Christ. How do we know? We tried it—and we had the best system of rules the world has ever seen!

Convinced that no human being can please God by self-improvement, we believed in Jesus as the Messiah so that we might be set right before God by trusting in the Messiah, not by trying to be good.

Have some of you noticed that we are not yet perfect? (No great surprise, right?)

And are you ready to make the accusation that since people like me, who go through Christ in order to get things right with God, aren’t perfectly virtuous, Christ must therefore be an accessory to sin? The accusation is frivolous.  If I was “trying to be good,” I would be rebuilding the same old barn that I tore down. I would be acting as a charlatan.

What actually took place is this: I tried keeping rules and working my head off to please God, and it didn’t work. So I quit being a “law man” so that I could be God’s man.

Christ’s life showed me how, and enabled me to do it. I identified myself completely with him. Indeed, I have been crucified with Christ. My ego is no longer central. It is no longer important that I appear righteous before you or have your good opinion, and I am no longer driven to impress God.

Christ lives in me. The life you see me living is not “mine,” but it is lived by faith in the Son of God, who loved me and gave himself for me. I am not going to go back on that.

See, to Paul, the idea of salvation, of belonging to God, is entirely wrapped up in trusting that Christ has already made that possible.

Not the law.
Not how well we understand and follow the law.
But the very fact that the Word became flesh and walked among us, making clear that God wants to us to be reconciled and in relationship with God and one another.

That is the transforming work of grace.

No longer focused on the law, Paul is able to focus on loving God and loving others, inviting them to know that same freedom.  The self-giving love of Jesus has changed Paul so radically that he lives as if he were newly resurrected- powered by the Christ who indwells him.   

So… when he hears that the Galatians have been taught that they must observe the law, so that people will see their faithfulness and know that they belong to the Way…  

Well, he has some words for them.  Strong words.

I can just imagine the Galatians, gathered at their synagogue around the leader for the day, the person who would read the letter… and it sounds just like the Paul they knew and loved…   

Listen for the Word of the Lord to them and to us…

3:1 You foolish Galatians! Who has bewitched you? It was before your eyes that Jesus Christ was publicly exhibited as crucified!  2 The only thing I want to learn from you is this: Did you receive the Spirit by doing the works of the law or by believing what you heard? 3 Are you so foolish? Having started with the Spirit, are you now ending with the flesh? 4 Did you experience so much for nothing? —if it really was for nothing.

5 Well then, does God supply you with the Spirit and work miracles among you by your doing the works of the law, or by your believing what you heard?

6 Just as Abraham “believed God, and it was reckoned to him as righteousness,” 7 so, you see, those who believe are the descendants of Abraham. 8 And the scripture, foreseeing that God would justify the Gentiles by faith, declared the gospel beforehand to Abraham, saying, “All the Gentiles shall be blessed in you.”

9 For this reason, those who believe are blessed with Abraham who believed.

Paul goes into a little more depth here, but we’ll jump forward to verse 23

23 Now before faith came, we were imprisoned and guarded under the law until faith would be revealed. 24 Therefore the law was our disciplinarian until Christ came, so that we might be justified by faith. 25 But now that faith has come, we are no longer subject to a disciplinarian, 26 for in Christ Jesus you are all children of God through faith. 27 As many of you as were baptized into Christ have clothed yourselves with Christ.

28 There is no longer Jew or Greek, there is no longer slave or free, there is no longer male and female; for all of you are one in Christ Jesus. 29 And if you belong to Christ, then you are Abraham’s offspring,heirs according to the promise.

This is the Word of God for the people of God…Thanks be to God
Thanks be to God, indeed.
I mean that.
Sincerely.

Even in his frustration, Paul is offering to the church in Galatia,  to us and to all who would follow Jesus, a reminder of the grace that allows us to claim our places as children of God.

All of us.

Not because we do a great job of rule-following.  In fact, we ignore the vast majority of the requirements set out for those who would worship the God we have come to know as Father.

Paul is reminding the Galatians that the Spirit’s work among them is all the testament the world needs to know that the crucified Christ is risen.  He is risen indeed!

Which leads Paul to ask the obvious question: Is any of what they are experiencing…
any of the transformation…
Are any of the healings…
any of the signs of God’s resurrection power…

Is any of that a direct result of their efforts to keep the law?

The question actually implies the answer for them:  NO.  Of course not.

It all comes back to faith.  That is, hearing and believing the truth about who Jesus was, how he lived and died, and trusting that the God whose promises are true raised this Jesus from the dead.

They were justified by faith.
Trust.
Belief.
All of which were being eroded by false teaching. Teaching that points back to Abraham’s circumcision as the beginning of the relationship between God and the Hebrew people.  

If we look back to Genesis 17, we understand where this tradition begins. This is the moment in which God makes these promises:
Abram will be the ancestor of a multitude of nations
Kings will be among his descendants
The land of Canaan will belong to his offspring in perpetuity
They will be God’s people.   Always.

And the sign- the seal of this covenant between God and Abram, now Abraham, is circumcision.  For all the generations since, the Hebrew men have been marked.
Literally.
This is how they indicate that they are part of the family.
That they belong to God through their connection to Abraham.
They are physically set apart.

And so, for them, it makes sense to ask the Gentiles to do just as Abraham and his family and all of their descendants did. And then to observe the laws given to Moses.

There is a beautiful continuity in these traditions.
A continuity that points to the faithfulness of God.
And to the efforts at faithfulness – however imperfect – of the people God has claimed.

This continuity is actually what makes Paul’s argument all the more powerful.  Because Paul reaches back even farther into Genesis…  even earlier in Abram’s story.

Abram and Sarai have faithfully followed God’s call out of Ur to who knows where… trusting God to lead them to some land they have been promised.  And They continue to wait for a child, though that promise seems more laughable by the day.  They cry out to God along the way, and finally God responds to Abram’s despair…

God brings Abram outside his tent and saying, Look up… count the stars in the heavens if you are able. That is how numerous your descendants will be.

Abram looked up, but he wasn’t really counting.
He was trusting that the number was uncountable.  

Once again Abram believed the Lord. And scripture tells us that the Lord reckoned it to him as righteousness.

And it was then God that made the first covenant with Abram.  It was a different kind of ceremony, one with visions and fire pots and carcasses of animals cut in half.  

All made possible by Abram’s trust.
By Abram’s faith that God’s promise was real that God’s word was true.  

It was at that moment that God claimed Abram and that Abram claimed God

And all those nations… all those descendants promised to Abraham?
All of them are equally God’s

Jew or Gentile
Male or Female
Slave or Free
All of them are have equal access to God’s grace

No hierarchies
No multi-tiered comparisons
No bonus points for circumcision
No demerits for eating pork or drinking wine.
In Christ, All of them are equally beloved

In Jerusalem, Antioch, Corinth, Galatia…
In Judea, Samaria and to the end of the world.

Paul expects the Galatians to be wise enough and mature enough to claim their place in the family, and not to be distracted by this call to observe the law.

There are too many people around them who need to hear the good news and to experience the new life that Paul and his friends are living. There are people in need of healing and visiting and feeding and clothing… in need of the body of Christ.

Now, before we go any further, I have a word of caution.
I want us to be careful though about where we situate ourselves in this story.

There are voices – prominent voices – in the American Christian millieu, who would have us believe that the church is being persecuted.  That we are under attack and that the true gospel is being watered down

They espouse a list of beliefs and behaviors that are definitely not a perfect match for those laid out in the Old Testament… but the list is long and is equally unlikely to bring life.

And that list is used to measure and judge, then label and stigmatize other beloved children of God.

Friends, I hope you hear this wrapped in all the love I have for you:

We are not called to bring judgment and shame upon one another
We are not called to segment the world into those we deem worthy and those who are not
We are not called to place spiritual disciplines onto anyone but ourselves

We are called to offer the peace of Christ, the love of Christ, the transformative presence of Christ in the power of the Holy Spirit

We are called to make disciples of all nations, baptizing them and teaching them the ways of Jesus.  This commission remains true for all time.

As does the message Paul has for all who become part of the Body:  

In Christ, all of us are equally God’s

Jew or Gentile
Male or Female or Genderqueer
Slave or Free
Republican or Democrat or Independent
Socialist, Capitalist or Anarchist
Gay or Straight, Pansexual or Asexual
Black, Brown, Caramel, Pink or White
Presbyterian, Baptist or Episcopalian
Young, Old and everything in between.

In Christ, ALL of us have equal access to God’s grace

No hierarchies
No multi-tiered comparisons
No bonus points for dressing more sharply
No demerits for taking decades to find the courage to walk through the doors of a church

All of us are equally beloved
Because it is our trust in God’s promises that make us righteous.

It is our belief that God truly is more powerful than sin
More powerful than our fears and our prejudices
More powerful than our capacity for hatred and war

Our belief that God is more powerful than death…
That is what grafts us into the family of God

The proof of which is the work of Holy Spirit in and among us

Because it is only the Holy Spirit at work among us that moves us
To go beyond rote prayers of confession to repentance of sin
To set aside division and unite in the work of worship and justice

It is the Holy Spirit at work among us that moves us
to set aside our fears and long-held prejudices
and welcome the alien and the stranger,
t
o choose love over hatred and to pursue the harder work of peace-making

All of which bring life and light into a world that reeks of death

Tomorrow is Memorial Day, but I feel like I have been commemorating the holiday for a week.  I visited all kinds of memorials last weekend.  

We walked around at the National Cemetery and Confederate Cemetery in Fredericksburg.  We didn’t go in, but we drove past the Arlington National Cemetery and happened to catch sight of some 800 marines at the Iwo Jima Memorial, commemorating the day that the flag was raised.

We were surrounded by Honor Flight soldiers getting off busses near the WWII Memorial, each wearing yellow jackets or shirts indicating whether they had fought in World War II, Korea or Vietnam.

As we headed to the Vietnam memorial, I called my friend Kathy in Minnesota. She hasn’t been able to visit the wall in DC, but she help me find her brother’s name using FaceTime.  We wept together from half a continent away as she recalled the brother’s whose death in war changed her family forever.

There was even a Blue Mile on the Half Marathon route- every few yards for an entire mile there was a poster with the photo and story or person holding a flag with the name of a marine who was killed on duty from WW1 right on up to current deployments in the middle east.  

It has been a week of remembering and grieving.
A week of facing the truth of just how many lives have been given…
All in the hope that we might know freedom.

On this last Sunday of the Easter season, we gather to remember
We gather to remember, but not to grieve
We gather to remember and to celebrate

One life, given for all time, so that we might know a different kind of freedom.
A deep, spiritual and eternal freedom.

We gather, as One Church, called by One Spirit, empowering us for One mission –
To build the kingdom of God in which no one is hungry,
no one thirsts,
and no one must go it alone

When we are one body, one church, all going after that one mission… Christ is risen.  

When we are one body, one church, all going after that one mission… He is risen, indeed.

And so she did

This is me, standing in the finisher’s area after completing my first half-marathon.

That smile… it was absolutely fueled by adrenaline, pride, gratitude and all the “holy crap did that just happen?” that you might expect.

I have to say that the Historic Half was a great event in and of itself.  The community support was outstanding.  People were out in their yards and along the sidewalks.  One family made a BINGO (well… RUNGO) board and the kids were marking off athletes who carried flags or wore Marine Corps shirts or pushing strollers.

Other families offered watermelon and water between the official pit stops.  There were cowbells and signs and sidewalk chalk.  It was clear that they were there for the long haul, ready to support the fastest and the slowest and all of us between.

The route was challenging. I was as mentally prepared for the hills as I could be, since we drove the course on Saturday.  At least, I knew kind of what was coming. What I didn’t know was whether my legs were truly ready.  There’s only so much hill work on can do in the flat lands of Central Florida.

I blazed through the first 5K and thought, “well, I hope I didn’t just burn up my last 5K.”  When I got to the 10K mark (not quite halfway), I was still ahead of my expected pace, despite lots of rolling hills.  But I still felt really strong and was breathing well, so I figured I’d just keep adding to the cushion.

That’s pretty much the way things continued. I was paying attention to my legs and my lungs, pushed up the hills and relaxed down them, was able to chat a bit with spectators and other competitors… and then we were at the last 3.1 miles, 2 of which are mostly uphill.

I found myself powering up Hospital Hill (the infamous part of the course), past other folks who were struggling, grabbing a water at the station and taking on the last hill over a bridge into the home stretch.  And yes, there were a few tears as I entered the last .1 of the 13.1, but I totally enjoyed the moment as strangers cheered me into the finishing chute.  My intrepid sister/cheering section was right there yelling my name and reminding me to smile for the camera this time.

Not that I really NEEDED reminding.  Endorphines are good for that!

Some FAQs:

How did you feel about the race, technically? I finished about 10-15 minutes faster than my “it could happen, but not likely” goal.  My splits were pretty even, and the 5K and 10K both beat my current bests times at those distances as standalone races.   All of which makes me happy as a newbie.

 

 

Are you going to do this again? Actually, yes.  Going in, I was hedging my bets that I’d like this distance as a walker.  But I honestly think I could have done another couple of miles, which makes me think I can break three hours…

In fact… the next half-marathon on my calendar is in October, at Niagara Falls (finishes at the falls in Canada!).

Couch to 13.1 in 12 months. Really?

I’ve been training so long, it’s hard to believe it’s coming up so quickly now! 

As of this moment, I am 3 days and 15 hours (and some minutes) from the start of my first half-marathon.  A year ago, that concept would have had me laughing.  Hard.  Like pee-your-pants hard.

But a funny thing happened on May 21, 2016.  I got out of the house and took a walk.  It was about 2 miles, wearing the kind of shoes that give you blisters, and really slow.

But it was a walk. On purpose.

That was the start of a year-long adventure in setting goals, finding community, making healthier choices, and pushing myself to do things that seemed a little crazy. Especially for a fat woman turning 50.

After a couple of 5Ks turned into a 10K, and the 10K walks turned into 8-10 milers, I set my sights on a 13.1 mile race.  I knew I needed time to get faster, so late spring felt possible. The interwebs offered up several choices… not all of which are friendly to walkers.

I chose the Marine Corps Marathon Historic Half.  Partly because I have heard amazing things about the MCM as an event.  And partly because I had hoped we could take our motorcycles up on the AutoTrain and ride home.  That hasn’t worked out for this round but adventures still await.

It wasn’t until after I registered that I realized the significance of the race date. I would be walking my first half-marathon on the anniversary of that first “get up off the couch” walk.

I don’t know what my time will look like… I’m hoping that I can manage the nerves and the hills well enough to average 14-15 minute miles, which would mean I’d finish under 3.5 hours.  My last couple of races, I’ve been well under 14, but that’s here in the flat swamplands of Central Florida.

Regardless, I will confess to more than a little pride in the fact that I’m going to start that race in roughly 3 days and 15 hours.

Because while I’m competitive enough to want an official time that is faster than my practice times.  I have accomplished so much more than walking a shit-ton of miles in a year.

  • I have lost almost a supermodel’s worth of weight, which is most visible part of this adventure.
  • I have gained a resting heart rate.  And normal blood pressure.
  • I have re-gained flexibility and strength that I was pretty sure were gone forever.
  • I have re-learned how to rest and sleep.
  • I have changed my relationship to food (for the better).
  • I have bought girl clothes. And I have worn them. In public.  Without irony.
  • I have learned how to make time for me sacred.  And by making space for the Spirit to join me there… I am experiencing daily times of Sabbath

Yeah… there’s a pretty good chance I’ll be weeping  3 days, 18 hours and however many minutes from now. There’s mix of pride, amazement and gratitude for the way the human body responds to challenges that comes at the end of every race, and more of that mix  has a way pushing out through the tear ducts as the distances have gotten longer.

Here’s To the difference a year can make.  Really!

Me in Spring 2016

When Worlds Collide

A sermon based on the Council at Jerusalem as described in Acts 15:1-18

It would be really hard to overstate just how important this particular episode in the early history of the church is. I mean, up to this point, the Spirit has been leading the disciples to do exactly what Jesus commissioned them to do:take the good news out from Jerusalem, farther and farther away from that upper room.

And as they traveled into Judea and Samaria and around the region, the Lord first added to their numbers people who spoke all kinds of languages, people who looked very much like the disciples and some who looked very different, people who would have claimed to be Pharisees, Saducees, Essenes… many different streams of Judaism.

It was pretty heady stuff.

Every where they went, the apostles (and some others) were part of God’s work: there signs and wonders, healings, visions, transformations, narrow escapes and miraculous interventions.

And then, about ten years before this particular gathering, Gentiles like Cornelius began to hear and respond to the Jesus story.  

These Gentiles are people who had not grown up looking for a Messiah.
People who had never been part of the Hebrew culture.
People who came to understand God ONLY by way of Jesus.

And they, too, were folded into the body of believers who worshiped and prayed and cared for one another and the communities in which they were situated.

As you might expect, gathering people from many different backgrounds and traditions into a unified worshiping community wasn’t easy. There were more than enough arguments to go around in every city the where Christ-followers founded a congregation.  Questions about how what it meant to be Gentile and part of the Jesus movement popped up pretty regularly… and now it was coming to a head.

The church in Jerusalem was made up primarily of Jewish believers. Which makes sense, really.  Even though the city housed other people groups, the majority of those who responded to the good news in Jerusalem were folks who worshiped at the Temple.

About 300 miles away, in Antioch, Paul, Barnabas and others had built up a thriving worshiping community that was primarily made up of Gentiles.  They were teaching and preaching, and all seemed to be going well.  Until these “certain individuals” from Judea arrived.

These individuals argued, from a deeply held personal conviction, that all followers of Jesus were meant to be Jews…  that in order for the saving work of Jesus to be effective on their behalf, the gentile believers would need to be circumcised.  They would need to follow the law in all ways.

After all, Jesus was a Jew.  He taught from the Torah, and the early Christ-following communities studied the Hebrew Scriptures.  

The question being raised – which is actually a fair question – is this: can Jesus be the Jewish Messiah and offer salvation that was somehow disconnected from the Law?   

Now – we need to remember that the rabbinic tradition is based on debate and discussion. Get a bunch of theologians together and they’ll talk forever, often disagreeing. This is true of most rabbis, who tend to be ok with a broad range of interpretations. That is why Jesus was generally unfazed by the leaders of the synagogues and in the temple challenging him to explain his authority and give more details about how he interpreted the scriptures.

Paul, being a Pharisee himself, would have entered into these lively conversations  with passion and maybe a little pride in his expertise and knowledge.  

I would imagine that Peter’s passion would have equalled Paul’s, given what we know about his passion for Jesus, so he would have felt compelled to argue his position, even if he had less formal training in the scriptures themselves.

Anyway… when Luke tells us “there was no small dissension and debate” in Antioch, I feel safe in assuming Luke was being funny.  Anyone who has shared their experiences in contentious meetings (church or otherwise) knows how effective a little understatement can be in setting the tone for a story.  

There was no small debate…  not only because Paul was passionate, but because this was a really big deal.

Paul’s worlds were colliding

His past…
his role as defender of the purity of the faith,
keeper of all laws,
crosser of t’s and dotter of i’s….

was crashing smack into his current ministry…
finding the nuance and the balance between the law of Moses and the law of love.
Seeking the way of Jesus, which was not about jots and tittles, as much as healing and reconciliation.

Paul knew what was at stake.
This was not an argument about circumcising the male gentile Christians in Antioch.
This was about understanding the grace and mercy at the heart of the saving work of Jesus.

It was well worth a 300-mile trek to Jerusalem.
It was worth engaging in yet another round of debates.

Of course, like debater, he makes stops along the way, telling his stories and building his case.  Perhaps he was even doing a little market testing – finding the best words and stories to help others see what he was seeing, to understand what he was arguing.

You know what I love about this story? The one thing that really kind of surprised me.  When they got to Jerusalem, they were welcomed.  They were welcomed by the church and the apostles and the elders, who wanted to hear all that was happening among them.  

These folks knew why Paul and Barnabas had come up from Antioch.  They could have put up their defenses and been wary of conversation. But they opened their hearts and arms and welcomed them. They listened to the stories of Paul and Barnabas; they heard about the ministry in Antioch.

And then, the moment they had been braced for…

Some believers – just to be clear here, these are people who followed Jesus just as faithfully as Paul – some believers who belonged to the sect of the Pharisees stood up and said, “It is necessary for them to be circumcised and ordered to keep the law of Moses.”

It’s all well and good that they have heard about the Messiah. It’s wonderful that they understand his teachings and that this gathering of believers looks and sounds a lot like ours.

But a statement of faith is not enough.  If they are going to be in… they have to be all in.  They need to be circumcised and instructed in… and held accountable to the Law of Moses.  You have to order them to do so.

There it was.  

The people’s concerns had been voiced.
The Apostles and elders gathered.
The debate begins.
And this time Luke skips the understatement.

They went on for quite a while, the apostles and the elders. And then it was Peter who reminded the council that it was God who made clear that he was to preach among the Gentiles.

It was God who poured out the Holy Spirit on those who believed… and the Spirit was clearly at work in and among the Gentile believers, just as clearly and powerfully as among the Jewish followers.

And sounding an awful lot like the Paul we meet in his letters to the fledgling churches in Corinth and Galatia and elsewhere, Peter reminds his Jewish brothers that none of them had ever been able to keep the law perfectly.  Nor had any of the generations of Jews who handed down the faith to them. In fact, the saving work of Jesus is based on his fulfillment of the law on our behalf.

Why then, Peter asked, would we place burdens on these believers that we cannot carry ourselves?

The silence that followed must have been thick.
Thick with the tension that comes with inner turmoil and shifting balance of influence.
Thick with the palpable energy that marks the Spirit at work.

And into that silence, stories were told.
Then prophecies were remembered and scriptures were consulted
And after no small amount of time… they came to agreement.  

The council came to a place of consensus and were ready to spread the word.

Not that everyone was happy.  Not that everyone in every congregation agreed. In fact, this would come up again and again.

But in that gathering, the apostles and elders had discerned together that this was the will of God.  

And because they came together
Because they did the hard work of listening to one another and God
Because they trusted the work of Spirit as evidence of God’s desires
Because of the way they enfolded Gentile believers…

Generations of Christ followers have come to understand that  God’s grace and mercy – not ritual or law-keeping – are the basis of our salvation.

There is nothing you or I can do under our own power that will get us in
There is nothing you or I can do under our own power that will keep us in

We – you and I – are a part of God’s family, God’s people because God made a way, in the life, death and resurrection of Jesus.

That is good news, indeed.

But there is more good news.
There good news in this story for the church – for the Body of Christ.  

The church can live through hard conversations.
The church can live through conflict.
The church can find its way from deep division to unity of vision

Because it has, from its very beginnings.

But the process is important… and is critical for our elders and deacons to understand
These leaders demonstrated what it means to be spiritual leaders
They were seeking to grow in their faith
They were willing to gather and listen to others with great respect – even when they knew they disagreed
They made space for silence, because it is in that space, in that quiet, that God is likely to speak
They looked back to tradition
They looked out into the world
They looked for and trusted what God was doing right then, even if it contradicted what they expected to find
They went to scripture, looking for confirmation of a new decision, not just to shore up old arguments.

And when the decision was reached, they spoke honestly about the process (Luke lets us know it was hard and long!) and they moved forward together to help others get on board.

In other words, they allowed the Spirit to move them toward unity

See, there is nothing we can do under our own power to lead the church
There is nothing we can do under our own power that will keep us (all of us – together) in the will of God.

We can only attempt those things if we live in dependence on God in the power of the Holy Spirit.

When I talked to Flo on Wednesday evening, she mentioned being a little relieved at not having Sunday School this week- that she was not excited about having to tackle this passage…   I get that…  Really, I do.

I wasn’t super keen on preaching this passage.  It’s all about conflict.

And let’s be honest, this congregation has experienced plenty of conflict over the years. What happens if we mention conflict? Will that bring back to the surface all the stuff that has been neatly stashed away?  Or will it make people push it farther into the shadows?  It just seems a little fraught…

So, yeah, I get why this seems like a downer.

But the more I looked at this passage, the more I see it as a message of hope. For us, for the whole of the church.

If we place Christ at the center of our relationships
If we believe that God in our corner (not mine, not yours, but ours).
If we open our hearts, minds and eyes to the work of the Spirit…

There’s not a conflict we can’t work through
There’s not a barrier we can’t tear down…  so that all might experience grace of God in Christ Jesus and become a part of the family of God.

And that right there?

That is what we are talking about when we say “Christ is Risen!”
He is risen, indeed.

How did we get here?

Acts 8:26-39  (Philip’s encounter with the Ethiopian eunuch)

I have to say, Luke set many interesting scenes and introduced a number of fascinating characters in his gospel and the beginning of Acts, but the farther we go, the more intriguing his narrative gets.

In a continuation of the travel motif in his telling of Jesus’ ministry, Luke makes clear at the start of Acts that we will be learning how the good news travels from Jerusalem outward… to Judea and Samaria and to the ends of the Earth.

In fact, after Stephen was stoned, he tells us that all but the apostles left Jerusalem to avoid the worst of the persecution, including another of Stephen’s cohort, Philip.  Philip found himself in Samaria.  Luke describes Philip’s ministry there at the beginning of Chapter 8:

5 Philip went down to the city of Samaria and proclaimed the Messiah to them. 6 The crowds with one accord listened eagerly to what was said by Philip, hearing and seeing the signs that he did, 7 for unclean spirits, crying with loud shrieks, came out of many who were possessed; and many others who were paralyzed or lame were cured. 8 So there was great joy in that city.

Luke doesn’t give us a sense of how long Philip was there before Peter and John joined him, nor how long before the messenger from God told Philip to head out to the middle of nowhere on the road to Gaza.

And he got up and went.

I do kind of wonder what he expected to find there… or perhaps, having done many signs and wonders in the power of the Spirit, he had learned to set expectations aside. That would go a long way toward explaining his openness to just get up and go.  And to just start jogging alongside a chariot when the Spirit moved him.

I mean, surely it was not on that morning’s task list to catch up to a chariot belonging to a eunuch from Ethiopia.

We don’t get the name of the man Philip is sent to meet, but we do learn he is among the courtiers of the queen of the Ethiopians.  And that he is headed back home from a time worshiping in Jerusalem.

Now – Luke’s original readers would have understood a few things about this man that most of us don’t.

It was not unusual for male members of the royal family to face castration once it was determined they were not in line for the throne. By removing the possibility of producing an heir, the likelihood of their leading an overthrow was slim. This also meant they could be trusted to serve in high level roles, such as caring for the queen’s treasury.  So, it is possible that he was not just a courtier, but royalty, part of the royal family.

Many of the people who lived under Roman rule around the Mediterranean were fascinated, captivated even, by the exotic look and sound of people from Sudan, Ethiopia and the African edge of the known world of the time. That would have made this encounter all the more intriguing.

Another detail Luke seems to trust us to know is that there are Jews even as far away as Ethiopia. It’s not clear how long they had been in the country. Perhaps they were influenced by the exiled Hebrew people there.  But he was at the very least familiar with the Hebrew scriptures.  

So…we have a nameless Ethiopian who is clearly educated and wealthy:
He is literate and reading from the scroll of Isaiah.
He has the means to own this expensive scroll, as well as a chariot and probably someone to drive it. After all, it would be just this side of impossible to hold open a scroll and drive at the same time. The chariot must have been large, given that Philip was able to join this man and share with him the story of Jesus in answer to his question about the scroll.

But despite all his wealth, status, and intellect.
Despite his knowledge of the Hebrew scripture and desire to be righteous, like all eunuchs, this man was only just barely part of the community, marginally allowed to participate at the temple

Not accepted and affirmed…. but not outright rejected.
Until that day.

It all happened so fast.
A conversation, a baptism, followed by the long ride home.

And for Philip- undoubtedly- a conversation with his friends
How did you get there?  Of all places?
Out on the edge of reality, experiencing God’s glory and power in a way that was unique, even for the early church?

It’s common question when things seem way out of the ordinary…
Whether beyond our wildest dreams or our worst nightmares. 

How did we get here? 

How did we get here?
Into the family of God… into this place, worshiping as the Body of Christ?  

Like the Ethiopian… our stories start at the font, in the water.  With baptism.

Like the eunuch… we each and all needed God’s grace to be extended to us, in order to be welcomed into the family and begin our journey as followers of Christ.

The innate desire to be whole, to be known, to see the new Kingdom of God reign, that may well have been why he was reading in Isaiah…

The passage quoted in today’s scripture is from Isaiah 53, in the section that prophecies about the suffering servant. For most Hebrew people of that time, particularly those living beyond Jerusalem and the few cities the Christ-followers had visited, this passage was still imagining a future messiah.  They were – and today’s Jewish people still are  – waiting and watching.  

But when Philip heard those words that morning, whether he had heard it preached before, whether he had considered it himself before, the Holy Spirit opened his heart and mind with new clarity.  

That suffering servant sure sounded an awful lot like Jesus.

And because he was open and willing to follow the Spirit, not just physically, but into new spiritual and religious understandings, Philip had the opportunity to help one more person understand.

Through scripture that clearly made sense to him, this eunuch heard and understood Jesus was the messiah and that he, too, was welcome into the Christ movement.   

There must have been, somewhere in that conversation on the road to Gaza, a description of Jesus’ call to repent.  And there was likely a mention of the call for followers of Jesus to go and tell others- the commission to make believers, teaching and baptizing them.  

Perhaps, Philip explained all of this in the context of his own story,
remembering his baptism,
remembering Stephen’s faithful witness,
reminding his new friend that he had been sent on this particular day to this particular road.   

And the eunuch knew a beautiful thing when he heard it.
Is there any reason I can’t be baptized?

Philip also knew a beautiful thing when he heard it… and didn’t hesitate.
Is there anything to keep you from being baptized? 

This person’s race, nationality, or sexual identity… None of it was a barrier to the Holy Spirit. Here he was with a human being who heard the good news about Jesus, who was compelled to become part of this way of knowing God, and who had requested baptism.

Who was Philip to stand in the way?

Even their being in the wilderness – on a road through the desert – there was water!

In Luke’s gospel, he made clear:
Wherever Jesus is, there is salvation.

Jesus has ascended, leaving the Spirit to guide and empower his followers as they continue his work. Luke is making clear that wherever those followers are open to the will of God, there, too, is salvation.

Wherever the Body of Christ is, there is salvation.
Salvation looks a lot like a puddle or pond or oasis of grace on the side of the dusty road through life
Salvation looks an awful lot like welcome,
Salvation looks an awful lot like hospitality beyond what etiquette requires
Salvation looks an awful lot like love without prejudice, without assumptions.
Salvation looks like becoming part of the beloved community.

See – the good news isn’t that Jesus suffered
The good news is that Jesus didn’t stop at suffering
The good news is that Jesus understood that we humans get way too comfortable allowing people to suffer:
That as long as we are comfortable, we are ok allowing others to suffer
from hunger and illness,
from relational exile,
from addiction or imprisonment,

And he wasn’t OK with us being OK. 

Jesus witnessed all of that, healed all of that and fought against all of it and suffered tremendously himself as a result.

Not because God wanted to experience suffering through Christ,
Not because God was so angry with humanity that Jesus became the outlet for divine wrath.

Jesus’ shared in the suffering of those around him so that he might show the children of God how to get uncomfortable for the sake of others,
s
o that when we hear that other sibling are suffering…
so that when we see others causing suffering…
we are moved to compassion and repentance, as well as advocacy

The life, death, and Resurrection of Jesus was God saying loudly and clearly for all time:
it doesn’t have to be this way.

We don’t have to get tangled up in getting every detail right,
Or worry about who should be in or who to keep out…
By grace, even our missteps are redeemed. Our hearts are freed to focus on God and the loving heart behind the rules and rituals.

The sending of the Holy Spirit and the empowerment of the church was God saying loudly and clearly for all time that we are God’s plan

We are God’s Kingdom come and God’s will being done.
Right here on earth as it is and will be in Heaven.
Not just praying it, but believing it and being the builders of that Kingdom.

All of which begs the question, how did we get here?

For real… how did we get here?

How did we – the church in 2017 in America – get here?

How did we – by and large – become a body that is more comfortable behind gates and walls and fences than out walking among those who are suffering?

How did we get here?

How did we become more like the rich young man who refused to lay down his wealth so that he could follow Christ without distraction?

How did we get here?

How did we become a body that allows our members to claim allegiance to Christ while using their power to place millions of people in harm’s way through endless wars, environmental destruction and cruel legislation?

How did we get here?
More importantly, are we ok being here?
Because, I’m pretty sure we are not where the Spirit of God is.

Oh, yes, each of us has moments.  And groups of us are able to come together for short stretches of time and do good work in the name of the one who saved us.

But being faithful witnesses in our Jerusalems, our inner cities…
Bearing witness in our Judea and Samaria, our states or even the nation…
Being humble servants like him… Taking the healing message of Christ…to the ends of the earth?

As I scan the headlines, I don’t see much in the way of hope, compassion, grace or peace.
I don’t see the people of God working to bring the Kingdom of God to fruition.
At least not one that looks like the Jesus we’ve been reading about all spring.

Which makes me want ask…
How do we get to the places Jesus calls us to be?
How do we get there?

The answer is at the font.
Remembering who we are, whose we are
Remembering the painful joy that flows from confession, repentance and grace

The answer is at the table.
Putting ourselves in a place to remember that God nourishes us and sanctifies us
Remembering that Jesus continues to proclaim to and through us
It doesn’t have to be this way
Because wherever the Spirit of God is, I am with you
So that wherever the Body of Christ is, salvation is

The answer is sitting in the pews around us.
Being the true Body – united in love.
United in a purpose that goes beyond us.

The answer is in the neighborhood
Being the Body by meeting real needs with true compassion

The answer is in the phone book and on the internet
Being the Body by calling the larger body to repentance.
Advocating on behalf of not only yourself but on behalf of those without access, without a voice, without the power or energy to advocate for themselves.

How did we get here?
We got here by the grace of God
We got here by the work of Christ

Where will we go next?
That depends… on just how open we are to the ministry of the Holy Spirit

Faithful Witness

A sermon based on Acts 6:1–7:2a, 44-60

This week, it’s time to hit fast forward…. Since we have to go in real time between Easter and Pentecost,  and since Luke doesn’t give us much content to explore in his gospel and in Acts between those days, we are going to jump ahead in the story a bit. I promise, we’ll come back to the action in the upper room on the day of Pentecost in June.

Heading into the remainder of Eastertide, we’re going to zip past that, past Peter’s first big sermon and the church’s first wave of converts. In fact, the rapid growth of the church in Jerusalem is part of the conflict that shows up in our passage for today.

Even as a city made up primarily of Jews, Jerusalem is fairly diverse. Many of its citizens are from the diaspora- those who had been scattered during the time of exile and had learned the languages and customs of the places they had settled.

The groups Luke identifies most often are the Hellenists and the Hebrews. It’s likely that he was using Hellenists to describe the Jewish people in the community who were more comfortable speaking Greek, and he probably used the descriptor “Hebrews” for those whose native language was Hebrew or perhaps Aramaic.

As the numbers of people following the apostles in the teachings of Jesus grew, so did the numbers of people who had particular needs. There were widows and orphans, there were people who were infirm and displaced.

The apostles were trying to figure all this out – how to keep telling the story of Jesus’ resurrection, how to help other people understand his way of approaching life and love, AND how to care for all those who were in great need… and it was more than a little complicated.

Until they realized that they could share the load. They didn’t have to do it all.   

Listen to the first few verses of Acts 6

6:1 Now during those days, when the disciples were increasing in number, the Hellenists complained against the Hebrews because their widows were being neglected in the daily distribution of food. 2 And the twelve called together the whole community of the disciples and said, “It is not right that we should neglect the word of God in order to wait on tables. 3 Therefore, friends, select from among yourselves seven men of good standing, full of the Spirit and of wisdom, whom we may appoint to this task, 4 while we, for our part, will devote ourselves to prayer and to serving the word.”

5 What they said pleased the whole community, and they chose Stephen, a man full of faith and the Holy Spirit, together with Philip, Prochorus, Nicanor, Timon, Parmenas, and Nicolaus, a proselyte of Antioch. 6 They had these men stand before the apostles, who prayed and laid their hands on them. 7 The word of God continued to spread; the number of the disciples increased greatly in Jerusalem, and a great many of the priests became obedient to the faith.

The twelve leaders brought in the larger community of disciples – the women and other men who had been around longest, were helping to support the work of the community. They could have done it all themselves, or attempted to control the process, but they trusted the Spirit to lead the community in this effort.

The prayers and laying on of hands conferred the authority and power to these men, so that they might make wise decisions and serve the community well.

And it seems that they did.  

The apostles continued in the work they were called to do… spreading the good news and teaching others.  And the work the church was called to do… it was done too.

It seems that when you are a faithful witness, when you stand up and speak truth to those with the power to make change- as the Hellenists did- you may indeed see justice.

The number of disciples in Jerusalem increased greatly.  Even many priests from the temple became obedient to the teachings of Jesus.  The Spirit was empowering this community of faith.  God was blessing their efforts.

Don’t you wonder what happens next?   Listen…

8 Stephen, full of grace and power, did great wonders and signs among the people. 9 Then some of those who belonged to the synagogue of the Freedmen (as it was called), Cyrenians, Alexandrians, and others of those from Cilicia and Asia, stood up and argued with Stephen.
10 But they could not withstand the wisdom and the Spirit with which he spoke.

Now, perhaps, like me, you’re wondering how did we get from Stephen serving in a role that looked more than a little like a deacon, to Stephen standing and arguing theology between the signs and wonders he was performing? He sounds more like a prophet than someone taking care of tables.

Truth is, Stephen was simply bearing witness -faithfully in word and deed – to the power of God and the resurrection of Christ. He was faithfully doing his work, and then responded to the call to show up, to speak up, to act up. To be Christ-like in every sense of the word.

It sure goes to show, you never know what might happen in the laying on of hands… And you never know how people will respond when you preach truth.

Certainly hearts can be transformed as the Spirit works and people are moved to compassion and hope and faith.

But hearts can also be hardened by fear, by desire to maintain their position of influence, by a lack of trust in God and in neighbor. And there were some in Jerusalem who were frightened by the power with which these followers of Jesus were speaking, including Stephen.

11 Then they secretly instigated some men to say, “We have heard him speak blasphemous words against Moses and God.” 12 They stirred up the people as well as the elders and the scribes; then they suddenly confronted him, seized him, and brought him before the council.

13 They set up false witnesses who said, “This man never stops saying things against this holy place and the law; 14 for we have heard him say that this Jesus of Nazareth will destroy this place and will change the customs that Moses handed on to us.” 15 And all who sat in the council looked intently at him, and they saw that his face was like the face of an angel.  

7:1 Then the high priest asked him, “Are these things so?”

Stephen, like Peter before him, begins to speak, not because he is an orator by nature, but because the Spirit of God was in him, ready to make known the truth.

His sermon is worth a read, though it is a bit rambling. He responds to their accusations by connecting the dots between Moses and Jesus, by describing the ways that God has been among them.  He finishes with some hard words… We’ll pick up near to the end.

2a And Stephen replied: “Brothers and fathers, listen to me…

44 “Our ancestors had the tent of testimony in the wilderness, as God directed when he spoke to Moses, ordering him to make it according to the pattern he had seen. 45 Our ancestors in turn brought it in with Joshua when they dispossessed the nations that God drove out before our ancestors.

And it was there until the time of David, 46 who found favor with God and asked that he might find a dwelling place for the house of Jacob. 47 But it was Solomon who built a house for him. 48 Yet the Most High does not dwell in houses made with human hands; as the prophet says,

49 “Heaven is my throne, and the earth is my footstool. What kind of house will you build for me, says the Lord, or what is the place of my rest? 50 Did not my hand make all these things?’

51 “You stiff-necked people, uncircumcised in heart and ears, you are forever opposing the Holy Spirit, just as your ancestors used to do.  52 Which of the prophets did your ancestors not persecute? They killed those who foretold the coming of the Righteous One, and now you have become his betrayers and murderers. 53 You are the ones that received the law as ordained by angels, and yet you have not kept it.”

54 When they heard these things, they became enraged and ground their teeth at Stephen.

55 But filled with the Holy Spirit, he gazed into heaven and saw the glory of God and Jesus standing at the right hand of God. 56 “Look,” he said, “I see the heavens opened and the Son of Man standing at the right hand of God!”

57 But they covered their ears, and with a loud shout all rushed together against him.

Sound familiar?   Luke is helping us remember, even as he tells the story of Stephen, what happened to Jesus.
Once again, the Sanhedrin is the location.
Once again the people are stirred up by a small number of those who are against this new stream of Judaism in their midst.
Once again, the story and promise of liberation, of redemption, of God’s love for the people of Israel and God’s power to turn the world upside down… the potential that Stephen was right about Jesus… that powerful teaching was enough to set this small group of leaders against Stephen.

And as he closes his impassioned and faithful witness to God’s promises made and kept, he knows that their hearts are not open.
That his time has come.
And he doesn’t back down.
He doesn’t back down. In fact, he looks up.  

He looks up and describes a vision of Christ as Messiah, ascended to heaven and reigning with God.

And while I’d like to say it’s hard to imagine the scene that comes next, we have seen all too frequently the reality that angry, frightened people do awful things.  And this crowd has been stirred up…
by the group that wanted Stephen quieted,
by the passion in Stephen’s voice,
by the truth in his words and the confusion in their hearts.

They were ripe for a riot.  

58 Then they dragged him out of the city and began to stone him; and the witnesses laid their coats at the feet of a young man named Saul. 59 While they were stoning Stephen, he prayed, “Lord Jesus, receive my spirit.”

60 Then he knelt down and cried out in a loud voice, “Lord, do not hold this sin against them.” When he had said this, he died.

Stephen was a faithful witness to the end.  And like the prophet, teacher, messiah he followed in death, he asked that those responsible for his death might be forgiven.

I’ll be frank with you. I don’t know how to get there. I don’t know how to get to that kind of forgiveness.
I mean, I am a person of faith.  I believe that Jesus was who he and his closest followers and generations of disciples after claim him to be.

I don’t understand them, but I believe that there were signs and wonders wherever he went. I believe he healed and forgave and set people free from all manner of ills.

And I believe that both he and Stephen meant those words, “Forgive them.”  

But I am pretty sure I am far from mature enough in my faith to be able to do that.   To ask for forgiveness on behalf of someone who is in the midst of an unspeakable act of cruelty.

But then I have to look again at what they saw…
The people who came after Jesus.
The people who came after Stephen.
They were – in their own ways – making every effort to be faithful witnesses.

And they were, just as much as Jesus, equally as much as Stephen or you or me… Children of God, beloved and worthy of compassion.

It would be easy to characterize them as evil people.  Or at least people who have been overtaken by evil.  In fact, that very characterization has been an excuse for generations of anti-semitism as Christians blamed Jews for killing Jesus and early martyrs like Stephen.

Stephen himself called them stiff-necked, calling to mind Moses and his frustration with the generation God called him to liberate.

Stubborn, yes.
Evil?  No.

You know –  faithful Christ-followers today find themselves disagreeing about what Scriptures say about many difficult topics.Not just because of their political party affiliations, though that does sometimes get in the way…

No- I’m talking about people who have spent hours with the Bible and commentaries and the Holy Spirit in conversation with God about
whether the Body of Christ should support the death penalty
or should be ok with using drones as opposed to foot soldiers in a war zone
or if we should lead the way in welcoming immigrants and refugees
or whether the church should limit the role of women or fully embrace and affirm LGBTQ folk in church leadership.

Because the scriptures are complex and complicated, the answers to those questions aren’t simple and faithful people come to very different conclusions.

Within denominations or with theological cousins, within particular congregations, even within this congregation, we Christians have been known to throw some pretty large (if metaphorical) stones at one another. Often causing significant emotional and spiritual wounds.

We are passionate about holding our position, stiff-necked even, and we believe that God is equally passionate about supporting us. And so we bear witness to what we understand God is saying to us.

We make every effort to be faithful witnesses.
But what happens if we’re wrong?  

What happens if we’ve spent years arguing and fighting against what we perceive as a threat, or what we believe to be unfaithful? And then we find that we were wrong?

There was a young man on hand at Stephen’s death. His name was Saul.

The people who were ready to stone Stephen, to kill him for his words – they put their cloaks at Saul’s feet.

We don’t know the timeline…

It may be that this is the moment that launches his career as the persecutor of Christians.
Or perhaps it verified for him that he was right…
Or maybe he was among the pot-stirrers that got the whole incident started.

Luke doesn’t say.   But he does tell us, going into Chapter 8, that Saul approved of their killing Stephen. And that a severe persecution began against the church in Jerusalem, and all except the apostles were scattered throughout the countryside of Judea and Samaria.

And you and I, we know more of the story to come;
we know about the redemption to come.
The re-orientation that was coming in Saul’s heart, so complete that it made him a new man.
So complete that he needed a new name.

And I wonder, was it the prayers of Jesus and of Stephen that set in motion the work of God to make that change? Was it the forgiveness that flowed as thick as their blood?

Was it that faithful witness to God’s enduring love and mercy that made possible the change in Paul’s heart?

And then made it possible for the very church he had persecuted to see and hear and embrace him as a leader among them.

I wonder…
I wondered about that quite a bit this week. And then I begin to trust.
Because there is power in forgiveness,
healing power,
saving power,
resurrection power

And there is even greater power in the seeking of forgiveness:
In the confession of our own sin, of our shared sin,
In the confession of our complicity in the pain and oppression of others nearby and worldwide
In the confession that we, too, can be stiff-necked and proud, when God would have us humble and willing to bend

There is power in confession and forgiveness and orienting our hearts to God.

Not the sort that lords over another, but the sort that allows the Lord to enter a relationship to heal and redeem it.

That is the power of full submission to God’s will,
The power of choosing to bear witness to God’s great love, not by force, but by faith

Bearing witness by taking risks on the side of love and welcome,
On the side of forgiveness and compassion
On the side of life over death.

That is the hard work of being a follower of Jesus. Submitting to God’s will and bearing witness to the fullness of Christ’s teachings shapes our lives in community with one another even as it deepens our relationship with God.  And it is the means by which we assure succeeding generations have the chance to hear, believe and become faithful witnesses.  

I give thanks for the faithful witness of those who made it possible for us to worship here today.  The generations of women and men who built this church, literally and spiritually.

Can you give thanks for them with me?

I give thanks for the faithful witness of those who have fought for this congregation’s life, who are fighting for it even now.

Can you give thanks for them with me, too?

I give thanks for the faithful witness of  those who took the fight for the life of the Body of Christ elsewhere, when their gifts were no longer welcome in this place.

Can you give thanks for them?

I give thanks for the faithful witness of those who have endured the pain of staying when their gifts were less than welcome in this place.

How about them, can you give thanks for those dear ones, as well?

I give thanks, by faith, for the faithful witness of those who will use their gifts to express God’s love in ways we’ve not yet imagined… here in this place… to the glory of God.

I pray that we might all bear faithful witness to God’s grace and mercy, and God’s justice and love, to one another and to a world in need.

Today and every day to come.  Amen.

The Road Goes On

Psalm 30

This psalm is one of Thanksgiving, one that expresses the kind of hope and gratitude that has been earned and developed over time.

A psalm that reveals not only the depth of pain we humans experience in life, but the joy that comes when we find our way beyond illness, beyond grief, beyond separation.
When we find ourselves blinking and adjusting to the light of a new day, a new opportunity.
When we can’t help but give glory to God as we begin the next portion of our journey. Because the reality is that the road of life goes on.   

The Gospels tell us that Jesus was on the road for much of his life…

Of course we know he traveled with Mary and Joseph from Bethlehem to Egypt and from Nazareth to Jerusalem on multiple trips to the Temple. For most of the years he spent teaching and healing, he and his followers walked all over the region around the sea of Galilee.

During Lent, we followed them on the road to Jerusalem, where he spent his final week before being crucified. He was placed in a borrowed tomb nearby, and that was the final place anyone expected to see him.

And now, just hours after the women discovered the empty tomb, were reminded that he would be raised back to life, and then told their story to the others. Just hours after Peter ran to the tomb to confirm their story.  Just hours afterward, Luke tells this story about Cleopas and his traveling companion, listen…

Luke 24:13-35

Luke doesn’t tell us, but I suspect these two companions left Jerusalem around mid-morning. After all, they were discussing the mysterious events of the early morning.  And, they were clearly still unsettled by them.  

I can’t speak for you, but I can relate to this story more than I can to many others told about Jesus’ followers.  This story resonates with me because Cleopas and his friend are doing exactly what I do with my friends when something leaves me (or all of us) confused and unsettled.

We spend time talking it out.
We go back over the things we can wrap our heads around.  The verifiable details.
We recount the things that were most unbelievable.  The most difficult to reconcile with those verifiable facts.
We struggle out loud with the things that cause us pain, that leave us unable to go forward emotionally.

So when Jesus joins them on the road, they assume he would want to be folded into their conversation. And because this is the biggest, craziest news these friends have ever had to process, it’s stunning to them that Jesus has no idea what they’re talking about.

Of course, they don’t know who they’ve just invited into the conversation.  Luke tells us that – for reasons we don’t ever get – they were kept from seeing who he was.

But surely anyone walking away from Jerusalem, any Jew in particular, would have been talking and thinking about the events of the past week.  You might say it was the talk of the town.

But apparently not this man.
And it stops them in their tracks.
Literally.

They stop and look at him. Dumbfounded.
Dude- seriously?
You must be the only person in Jerusalem for the Passover feast that didn’t hear about it…
Or maybe you just don’t remember… ??
How many glasses of wine did you drink during that passover meal?
Huh.  Really. Ok… well… where do we start?

Perhaps they took it in turns to fill in some of the details that Luke leaves out. I mean the conversation went on for 7 miles!

But the gist of it was this…
Jesus was as important to the children of Israel at this moment as Moses was in his.
He was an amazing prophet, wise, powerful, before God and in front of all the people.
He was a liberator.
He was our hope.
And they took him away – the chief priests and the leaders.
They took away the one who would save the people.
And they had him killed.
They didn’t do it themselves, but they handed him over in a way that made clear what they hoped was going to happen.
It was awful. Everything about that trial and crucifixion.  Awful.
What were we supposed to do… he was the one we just KNEW was going to turn the world upside down.
We had hoped at the very least…

Well, now where are we left after all this?
Do we continue on his path?
Following his teaching?
We’ve spent the last couple of days wondering exactly how we could do that without getting ourselves nailed to a cross.

And now – today – on the third day since all of this got started, things got even weirder… maybe a good weird. But definitely more confusing.

So it just seemed like a really good time to leave.
Get some space between us and Jerusalem;
between us and the danger.
Between us and the sorrow.
Between us and what might have been…
What might still be… ?

Jesus- incognito as he was – must have been enjoying this a little.  Pulling the story out of them with nods and mm-hmmms.  Even as he smiled knowingly on the inside.  

There was so much they hadn’t quite understood, that they hadn’t quite managed to connect between his teachings and their current situation.

And so eventually, he can’t help himself.  

Even as he remains hidden from their recognition, he takes them back to Scripture and begins to teach.
Starting with Moses and moving through all the prophets.
He reminds them of all they’d heard – from the time they were children in synagogues to the times he was with them on the plain and in the various synagogues of the region and even in the temple courts.

They continued on down the road, talking, walking, teaching and learning until they finally arrived in Emmaus.

Now, I do a lot of walking, and when I get deep into a conversation with someone, it takes a lot longer than usual to get where I’m going.  So it doesn’t surprise me that a walk that could have been completed in a matter of 2-3 hours (even faster if you’re in a hurry), took the better part of the day.

And because they had been talking for so long, it makes sense that they would ask this stranger to stay, to eat, for sure, and perhaps to continue the conversation.

Doesn’t it just seem right that Jesus would say “yes” and join them at table?
After all, so much of his ministry happened around tables…
So much of his ministry was about making sure that everyone had a place at the table.

And doesn’t it seem right that it is at the moment Jesus breaks the bread…
When Jesus is doing the thing that is most HIM,
When Jesus is reversing the roles of guest and host,
When Jesus offers hospitality and sustenance through the blessing and breaking of the bread…
THAT is is the moment when it becomes clear who is at the table.

It wasn’t while he was walking and teaching… though he was surely reinforcing all that he’d said about himself over the years.  And certainly the teaching would have felt at least a little familiar.

No- it was at the table.

Perhaps it was his unique way of blessing the bread
Or the way he held it and looked at it.
Or perhaps the fact that this guest so humbly had taken the role of host to serve them

Regardless, in that moment, their eyes were opened.
They saw him
They knew that all he had said, on the road that day and on all the roads they’d walked together before,
they knew – deep in their hearts- that it was true.
They understood that he had been with them all along.
And then, he was gone.

Yes, it was baffling and unexpected.
And yet, it was so HIM.

Of course, they had to go and tell the others:
We have seen the risen and living Lord.  Thanks be to God!

You know, every time we gather at the table – every time we gather at the font, for that matter – there is a long prayer. The prayer of thanksgiving we call it.

And I know that it is annoying sometimes to listen to a prayer that long because I’ve felt antsy plenty of times myself. After all, we ministers seem to enjoy the sound of our own voices… And mercy, but we can make worship inefficient with long sermons and longer prayers.

But that prayer does what Jesus was doing on the road that day.
It is meant to remind us of just how far back we can travel and still not find the beginning of God’s love and care for us.

The prayer is meant to help us to rehearse and retell the story of our liberation from slavery, of God’s promises kept, of our salvation in Christ and through Christ, who is not only a great prophet, but is also the Messiah.

That long prayer is meant to remind us that we are at the table of the host who knows and loves us best.

Many of you wondered, some of you aloud and in my hearing, why we would add communion in today, when we we shared the bread and the cup on Maundy Thursday and again at Easter.  And it will be the first of the month in a couple of weeks.

Why add in one more round of communion?
The truth is, we need to be at the table.  

We need to be nourished, spiritually nourished, if we hope to live faithfully in this world of ours.

In our noisy, fast-paced, efficiency-focused culture, we are taught or at least convinced to ignore our spiritual hunger pangs – those longings for communion with God and one another- that ought to lead us to the table more often, rather than waiting for our regularly scheduled meal.

Coming together in fellowship at this table is crucial, because It is around the table that we reveal the body of Christ, in all of its human, flawed but forgiven glory.

It is at the table we experience the presence of Christ,
where we experience the grace that abounds as it extends to sinners and tax collectors,
And as grace extends to preachers and retirees, to teachers and business owners, and everyone else who hears and responds to his invitation to come, eat, and remember.

Preparing the table, whether once a month, or three times in two weeks, is an act that embodies faith,

Preparing the table in an act that embodies hope and embodies love.
Gathering the bread and the juice, setting the table, offering an invitation…
Each step of the way we are re-membering, re-enacting the hospitality of these bewildered disciples and their beloved Jesus
our beloved Jesus.   

Their hospitality opened the door, literally and figuratively, to the opportunity to encounter Jesus at this meal.

They welcomed the stranger on the road,  and he opened the scriptures in new ways
They welcomed the stranger at the table, and he offered a revelation of his care for them.

Luke’s telling of this encounter with the Messiah tells us that an encounter with the risen Lord requires two parties.
There is Christ’s divine act to come and reveal himself.
But we have a part to play.
Without an openness and vulnerability on our part,
Without a spiritual willingness to risk and a physical willingness to welcome,
we may as well just close the door.

For our eyes will not see and our ears will not hear,
And our hearts will not burn in the telling of this very good news:
Christ is risen.
He is risen, indeed.

Inconceivable

Primary Scripture: Luke 24:1-12

If you’ve watched the movie adaptation of The Princess Bride more than once, you probably can’t help but hear the word  “Inconceivable” in Wallace Shawn’s voice.  He is the brilliant stage actor who has become at least equally well known for playing Vezzini, the self-proclaimed genius and leader of a trio of criminals in the film.

Vezzini and his partners in crime kidnap Buttercup, the titular princess, and find themselves crossing a channel in a boat at night: a time at which they don’t expect anyone else to be sailing.

And yet there is a boat behind them.  

Not to worry says Vezzini… Probably a local fisherman, out for a pleasure cruise through eel-infested waters. But a little later it becomes clear that the boat is following them.  And even gaining on them.

Inconceivable, says Vezzini.

They reach the Cliffs of Insanity- aptly named as they are insanely high and impossible to scale. But Fezzik, the giant in the trio, is strong enough to climb AND to carry Buttercup, Vezzini, and the third of the crimninals – Inigo… all at once.

As they climb, whoever had been pursuing them by boat begins to follow them up the cliffs, using the same rope Fezzik is climbing.

Again,Inconceivable

They reach the top… the man continues to climb

Inconceivable.

Vezzini then cuts the rope, sure that their pursuer would fall to his death… but when they lean over the ledge to look, there he is, clinging to the cliff face. And then he begins to climb again.

Inconceivable!

At this point, Inigo turns to him and says, “You keep using that word… I do not think it means what you think it means”

I love that line…

Truth is, he’s definitely using the right word.  Every time the man persisted, it was illogical.  

The speed of his boat was beyond their understanding of sailing and physics.  It was beyond comprehension that anyone other than Vezzini’s strong man could climb straight up a cliff, much less quickly enough to close the gap between them. It was puzzling, unbelievable, confusing…  In a word – inconceivable.   

Luke never uses the word inconceivable as he describes the happenings on that first morning after what had been a tragic Friday and very long Saturday… but he sure could have.

Nothing was quite as expected.  

It’s easy for us to lose sight of that truth, having heard the story so many times, having gotten used to the idea, the miracle of it all.

But imagine living it.  In real time.

The women have been waiting, since sundown marked the beginning of sabbath and kept them from their work.  They knew what to expect, in terms of the process they would follow. The rituals they would complete.

They knew right where to look for the body. They knew what what they were about to see, and – I would imagine – dreaded the prospect of dressing a body that had been treated with such violence.  Especially seeing that evidence on the body of a man they loved.

Resolute, determined… they arrived.  The stone had been rolled away. Inconceivable

The body was gone…Inconceivable

Two men in really shiny clothes show up…Inconceivable

And truly, what the men had to say wasn’t much help in making sense of what they were experiencing.  At least not at first

“Why do you look for the living among the dead?  He is not here, but has risen.“

Wait… what?  What does that even mean?
No… We aren’t looking for the living.
Jesus is dead.  That’s why we’re here.

How could the mind possibly conceive of a living Jesus?
They had seen him crucified. They had seen him, lifeless.
So had everyone else….

But the men were right.  Jesus had said those words…
He had talked to them more than once about his death to come. And he had spoken about three days… and being raised…  

But even after seeing Jesus raise Lazarus from the dead.
Even after seeing countless people raised from spiritual, relational, and financial death to new life in community with God. Despite knowing that Jesus had the power to heal and more…

But Jesus’ teaching about being raised to life?
It had been more than they could wrap their heads around.
It was beyond recall.
It was inconceivable.

Until they remembered for themselves. They remembered his words; they remembered him saying those words, and that was enough. They left the tomb and they went to tell the story.  

Can’t you see it?

Mary Magdalene, Joanna, Mary the mother of James and several other women excitedly describing what had just taken place…

And the men’s response…

Psh… what?  Look… you all know we love you.
We’d all love to have Jesus back with us right now.
But come on…

For 10 out of 11 apostles… Jesus being alive was clearly inconceivable.
But the 11th, Peter, the one who had denied knowing and following him…
For Peter, It was conceivable.
It was plausible.
It was possible.

He had ears to hear.
He had eyes that were eager to see.
He believed enough to go to the tomb and see for himself.

And that spark of faith – Plausibility mixed with just enough hope and just enough love…It was enough to make it worth looking… And even worth the risk of being seen while he was at it.

See, faith is not about knowledge- at least solely about knowledge. Faith is an expression of courage-
the courage it takes to believe the unbelievable.
To conceive of the inconceivable.

Faith believes that there is life at the mouth of the tomb.
Faith believes that there is life in the words being spoken that morning.
That there was life in the words they had almost forgotten.

For the women and for Peter, faith is what told them that the words Jesus spoke can and should be trusted –  even though they made as little sense in the first light of this first morning of the week as they did while during the long journey to Jerusalem.

It took tremendous courage to go to the tomb, when the Roman powers who killed Jesus remained a very real, very present danger. Both for the women and for Peter

And they believed without even having seen the risen Jesus!

That’s the funny thing about Luke’s Easter morning account… Jesus isn’t there.
Not when the women arrive.
Not while Peter visits the tomb.

He is not among the dead.
He is alive and – presumably- out among the living

Among those who are actively worshiping God
Among those who love mercy and do justice
Among those who weep, who mourn
Among those who are pressed on every side
Among those in need of healing and yet trust that God hears them.
Among those with eyes to see, with ears to hear.

The sinners.  The tax collectors.  The cast-offs and rejects.
We still have a hard time believing that part… Perhaps we have a hard time believing Jesus is with them because we don’t want to be them.

But we do want to Jesus to be with us.
Clean, shiny Jesus; predictable, knowable Jesus.

But now that we’ve walked the road to Jerusalem:
The road that led us through the audacity of a Palm Sunday parade and the passion that cleansed the temple
The road that led us to an intimate dinner with a family of choice and the sorrow of betrayal, denial and arrest.
The road that led us to the cross and the deep sense of grief and powerlessness that death always brings.

We have arrived at the moment for which we have longed:
the day of resurrection!

And so now we must live.
Among the living.

We must believe it in our bones in spite of evidence all around us that the work of Christ is not done.

In a world that remains ravaged by loss and injustice, we are still challenged to believe in the power of the resurrection.
Not because it makes any logical sense
Not because we can science or logic our way to an understanding

We are challenged to believe the unbelievable, to trust the inconceivable, because the power of resurrection is the very power than can and will transform our daily lives.  As individuals and as a church.

The power of resurrection
The power of the God who created all,
The power of the God who loves all
The power that breathes life into tired bodies and newborn babies
That is the power that restores vision, renews faith and reconciles siblings in Christ that have long been separated.

I have no idea how that works.  But I have seen the power of resurrection at work. And you know what?
I don’t need to understand it in order to long to see it again.
In order to long for each and every one of you to experience it
In order to pray daily that we might – together – be the evidence of new life in this community.  

And so, when we sing Jesus Christ is Risen today, remember and trust, like the women at the tomb, like Peter, that the Christ we seek is the Christ who keeps promises.

And thus is we can trust that Christ is alive at work in the world.
In us
Through us
With us.
Now and in the age to come.

He is risen
He is risen indeed